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Reading. Nothing quite takes your brain for a relaxing, thrilling, or all out adventure of a ride like good fiction.

If you haven’t in a while, pick out an old (or new) book and give it a read. Your brain will thank you.



Right now I’m in Denver, waiting in line to submit plans for my company. As I write this post, the cluster of tired civilians accumulates like sand in an hourglass, while one person sits behind a granite desk attempting to handle the influx.

Have you ever been to the DMV? This situation mirrors its painful slowness. It may be hours before my name is called, so I’ve set up a make shift cot to get some shuteye in the meantime. When the sloths from Zootopia are finally ready my misery will cease.

Im being cynical, and in reality the wait is a good practice in patience. If your occupation demands waiting, find a way to be productive or creative while you wait. Patience is indeed a virtue.

Review – Black Mirror

Our “Black Bathroom Mirror”. Please don’t make that a show title.

If some of you have recently seen people walking around in a trance as if pondering life’s deepest questions, it’s probably because they just finished an episode of Black Mirror, and thus, are doing just that.

I was exposed (for better or for worse) to this show about two weeks ago on a ski trip. It was late, about 12 AM, but we decided to throw on an episode anyways before hitting the hay.

Black Mirror (BM) almost always begins innocently, with well rounded normalcy in the lives of  each character. As you continue watching, you’ll start to realize every episode features some aspect of technology blown way out of proportion. Whether it’s a device implanted under your skin that captures every memory you’ve ever had, or being able to rate those around you based on interaction, BM delves into the shadow cast by technology. And it’s strangely intriguing.

The episode finished, and each of us realized we were in the fetal position sporting a thousand yard stare. The show isn’t for the faint of heart.

Anyways, if you like sci-fi but wonder what could potentially happen if technology “took over the world” this show is for you. Just make sure your mind is ready for the inception roller coaster*.

(*Note, some episodes, in my opinion are much better than others. If you’re trying it out for the first time, try USS Callister, Nosedive, or overly risque Hang the DJ. Those are my top picks).

Cultivating Connections

I recently attained a new job at a company I’ve always wanted to work for (VERY exciting). They’ve got great people and wonderful opportunities to impact the surrounding community.

With this new transition came a desire to update my Linkedin account and reach out to some old acquaintances. As I was going through people to reach out to, my thoughts drifted to memories we’ve shared years back. I have had some good times with some good people growing up, and I don’t want to lose that in this new professional context.

Lesson learned: Don’t connect with people simply to make your profile look better. Connect with them because they have made a difference in your life or have shared quality experiences with you. Connect with people for who they are, not what they bring to the table.


Last week frazzled producers at the TED Radio Hour HQ thought it wise to re-upload a 2014 podcast. The 45 minute episode discussed money and its impact on the human race, aptly named ” The Money Paradox“. During the episode, a relentlessly intrigued Guy Raz interviewed a small mob of psychologists and economists saying close to the same thing: Humans simply don’t need more money than necessary to live on (and allow for occasional time to relax). They found that poorer people tended to be comparably more generous and much more willing to help out strangers in a bind.

In reflection of the podcast, timely played during the two weeks before my new job starts, I don’t feel like climbing the “corporate ladder”. I will work hard at what I love and try to contribute as much as I can to environmental innovation and conserving our Earth, but not for the money. I am privileged to have a roof over my head and a computer to write this post on. Given this new job, it’s time to start finding ways to increase awareness of how lucky I am, and act in reflection of that.

How can you use what you’ve been given, your privilege, to help others? I’d love to hear some creative ideas!



Push Through

Today was a hard day. Just after concrete testing we had some down time before supposed rebar inspections in the frigid air outside. I decided to quickly sweep our concrete testing area, conveniently located in a parking garage just east of the construction site. After construction is completed, our portion of the parking garage will be used for premier hotel guests.

During this time my boss took a look at the sweeping and realized some excess concrete had built up next to the testing site, sticking to the garage floor. I was handed a metal scraper and told to simply separate the excess concrete from of the floor. So, I grabbed the scraper and banged it against the concrete, watching as a spec the size of a small chocolate chip flew through the air and landed a few feet away. Again, I rammed the scraper against the concrete with excessive force, only to watch as the mound remained in an unbreakable embrace with the floor. I was furious, and, after multiple further attempts, I realized this method wasn’t going to work. An eternity of using the scraper as a chisel, a bucket of sweat (and tears), some slight cursing, and most of the concrete had been removed.

Now, I didn’t tell myself to get over my self pity, and continued to curse at the damn ground for just being there. I could realistically have told myself that it would take time and to push through, but I simply became more flustered with each seemingly useless whack.

Needless to say, when you encounter difficulty, no matter how insurmountable it may seem, try to have a realistic perspective. Rather than giving up, say, “This is going to take a bit of time and will probably be hard, but I’ll get it done before long.” Then finish the job. No whining, no cursing or self pity, just get it done. Hopefully it will help the task get completed faster, and you won’t end up crying in a heap on the ground. Food for thought.

Old Friends

I just got back from snagging a bite to eat with a high school friend. We haven’t seen each other in a while and I thought it would be good to see how he was doing.

A waitress kindly seated us at a nearby burger joint and soon we began a vibrant conversation. Talk drifted from our recent endeavors to the good ol’ high school days. He and I ran on the same cross country team and afterwards spent a lot of time attempting to mash buttons in an effort to destroy each other in Call of Duty (he always won). I noticed a few rabbit trails emerge throughout the discussion, though allowing each of these to play their course was quite enjoyable.

When was the last time you saw an old friend? See if you can get in touch with someone who you haven’t seen in a while. Try to reconnect and find out how they are doing. It’s pretty fun.